Along the Graafland mountains to the Zegveld

Alternating walk through forest and open dune

The Amsterdam Waterleidingduinen is one of the largest dune areas in the Netherlands. It consists of alternating dune landscape, coniferous and deciduous forests, quiet lakes, drift sand areas, swampy valleys and canals. You can fully enjoy peace and quiet and you can deviate from the paths to stroll through the dunes. The dune is 3400 ha (5 km wide and 10 km long). The drinking water for Amsterdam is being cleaned up here.

Difficulty: Easy walk

Length: 3 kilometers

Duration: 1 hour

Marking: yellow posts

Starting point: Entrance Panneland, Vogelenzangseduinweg 2 Vogelenzang

Catering: Boshut ‘t Panneland

Admission: Day tickets 1.50 euro Parking 2.00 euro.

Directions:

At the entrance you follow the yellow posts. We walk along the Graafland mountains into a wooded area. We follow the yellow posts and at some point turn left. The Zegvelderbos disappears slowly and there are more and more open plains. We now reach the Zegveld and now turn left. We lands the Oosterkanaal and cross it on the way to the exit.

Dune agriculture

Here too Duinlandbouw was involved. Zegveld comes from Zekveld. A Zek is an old name for a grass species that is very common here, especially in wet valleys. Here, cattle and young sheep were on the field. Due to the drying-out of the dunes there was an end to agriculture here.

Woodier at Vogelenzang

In the area of ​​Vogelenzang, the dunes become more woody. The dunes have made way for trees like the poplar and to the north of the Pannenland you will find the black pine. In addition to the hundreds of different species of birds, rabbits, martens, foxes and bats live in the dunes.

Very much fallow deer

In this area you will find Roe deer and here also lives the largest population in the wild fallow deer of the Netherlands. The calves are born at the end of May in early June and the bronest takes place in August / September / October. No cyclists are allowed to drive, but for walkers it is freely accessible outside the paths.

 

Roderick Burger
roderick.burger@gmail.com